This page is deprecated. The mapview packages deliveres much of the same functionality, and with less effort. Please explore the introduction to the saving maps with mapview.

On this page we demonstrate two methods of saving map files for sharing. The first method develops an interactive map that uses the entire web browser as the delivery mechanism. It’s a nice way to maximize screen estate, a desirable feature for maps. The second method saves the file as a shapefile, a broadly portable file standard in GIS analysis.

Please note that I disabled some of the code chunks for efficiency of processing. The process documented below does work, despite reported feedback errors: See the example output. This method should work for you as well, all the code is below. If you download this file from the repository, you’ll need to make a simple change to the last two code chunks: re-insert the r into the curley braces in the last two code chunks.

Save ineractive map as file

library(htmlwidgets)
tmap_mode("view")
interactive_sasw <- tm_shape(contiguous_states) +
  tm_polygons("wages", id = "Name")
interactive_sasw_map <- tmap_leaflet(interactive_sasw)
# This is an r code chunk, disabled.  
# To run this, insert the `r` into the 
# curley brackets as the first line of this code chunk:  {r}

saveWidget(interactive_sasw_map, "mymap_sasw.html")

For some reason, my process throws and error indicating the document conversion failed with a pandoc “Out of memory” problem. And yet, the map does get produced and stored as mymap_sasw.html.

Save as a Shapefile

# This is an r code chunk, disabled.  
# To run this, insert the `r` into the 
# curley brackets as the first line of this code chunk:  {r}


library(sf)
st_write(contiguous_states, "contiguous_states.shp")
 
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